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Charlotte Staerck of The Handbag Clinic on Handbag Designer 101 Podcast Every Tuesday



Emily Blumenthal

Host

00:00

Hi and welcome to the Handbag Designer 101 podcast with your host, emily Blumenthal, handbag designer expert and handbag fairy godmother, where we cover everything about handbags from making, marketing, designing and talking to handbag designers and industry experts about what it takes to make a successful handbag. From Charlotte Sturck to Handbag Designer 101, the podcast. Charlotte, you are co-founder and CEO of the Handbag Clinic, the only place to go in the UK for everything handbag before, during and after. Can I be correct to assume? Yeah, that's a good summary. Yes, it is the full life cycle of the handbag within the UK. I am so stoked to have this conversation just because what you've accomplished, being such an early adopter to the life cycle of a handbag Like I just want to dive right in, because right now, the ecosystem of where handbags is at it must feel really good that you were able to capitalize on it before people realized that they want to get their hands on used, labeled brand bags. So do you want to just dive right into the origin story? That is Charlotte. Yeah, of course. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

01:22

So, yes, handbag Clinic as we know it today has been operating since 2015. Prior to that, it was an offshoot from another business that still makes our products that we use in our clinic today. So it went from kind of being people who were requesting sofas to be fixed would request for the handbags to be fixed, and then that was sort of too artisans. And then I joined the business to take it into where we are today, which was retail stores, a large clinic where we have 15 artisans now and we work on hundreds and hundreds of bags every single month and in the UK we have the largest collection of pre-owned handbags available to shop on next day service. It's pre-owned. That feels like brand new and, yes, very much I was. People used to ask why did you do that with old bags? Or what do you do with old bags Before they knew? Because you knew yeah, exactly, we knew, and I mean I sold bags from being 16 on eBay. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

02:24

So how did that all start? I mean 16,. Were you a labels girl? Were you like? You know? Where did that love for high fashion handbags come from? Because it always has to come from someone. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

02:38

I honestly don't know. I am the only person in my family like this and I just always like nice things and I really liked handbags. When I was very young, I was given a embroidered handbag and it had a label inside, obviously, just from like. It would have been from sort of a market store or something. When I was about six or seven and I was getting teased in the playground for it, they were like why have you got a handbag to school? 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

03:05

Because you were wearing a school uniform that you made fabulous with a handbag. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

03:11

Exactly. I just looked it over my shoulder and said it's designer and walker. So you started it. Yeah, I've just always been obsessed with bags, but I couldn't really ever have afforded labels ever. It just wasn't, you know, in our reach at all. 

03:28

But what I did was I started working as soon as I could start working and I saved up with my first, the first money that I got in that I'd earned from a part-time job as a retail assistant, and I walked straight over and bought a DKNY handbag, and then I managed to buy another one, and then I sold those on eBay and then I would sell at buy bags and I'd worked my way up what I call the handbag ladder. 

03:57

So I would buy, you know, luella and DKNY, and then I worked my way up to a Muldry bag, which in the UK is you know, was used for it. It's the pinnacle, yeah, and now I own a mess. So you know I've finally the ladder to the top. You created the ladder, yeah, exactly. So it really just came out of a need for me to do that, because it was the only way I could see myself getting hold of these bags that I wanted so desperately, and then, obviously, in time it became part of. You know, once I launched this professionally, the sustainability impact just became bigger and bigger and bigger, and then the world caught up to us really. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

04:36

Can I ask you something, because this is like I am so digging this Were you one of those girls that had a backpack and a fancy bag for school? No, how? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

04:46

would you carry your bags? I would figure it out, I would not. Would you like? 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

04:50

hold your bags at a principal and a fancy bag, because God forbid you be seen with like a backpack, like how clever that. So you were one of those Like you'd rather slap your stuff. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

05:01

I think it was just it was more. For me it was like a fashion country thing, not as much of a sort of a play that. It was just like that's what how I wanted to be viewed with this nice handbag and I don't know, I've just I probably did commit the card Nelson of an overloading handbags with school books and things, and there's lots of times that I'd spill water bottles inside and things, which are all things that I'm back to licking six now, which kind of where the adoption of the business, like the growth of the business, came from. Because I would kind of before I committed full, wholeheartedly in 2015, and was like let's you know, go for this fall, I would say, you know, I had this problem with a handbag. What can we do? How can we fix this? Is this something that we could work on and help to create those products and services before we kind of launched them out fully as well, because I'm a customer of handbags like everybody else. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

05:56

I think you need to be. I think, look, in this day and age I mean I speak about this ad nauseam about having to have this intimate understanding of who your customer is, from what they have for breakfast to the car they drive to you know their priorities in terms of what they're doing with their disposable income. Right, and you being this like key demographic, of understanding this customer, of saying like, wow, she will save all her money just to have this one bag because this one bag is such an important part of her life, and what does that mean for her emotionally? And then you know it really comes down to what she defines a want versus a need and what she's going to spend her money on. 

06:43

I would love to talk to you about a few things the learning of authentication. And then you had said about like you obviously had day jobs before you fell into this, like were you day jobbing and then you saw your husband with a furniture clinic, and then you were like, little by little, I could just drop my bag off to get it fixed. And then people were asking you, like what's this whole story that got you to the handbag clinic, at least at the beginning? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

07:11

Well, I worked as a professional buyer for our NHS, so I studied in buying. All of my qualifications are in buying, but not for handbags. I always dreamt of being a fashion buyer and when I was about 20, I do remember saying I was I mean, you've got them in America, but we do pageants, you know, here, and very much more at a smaller scale, and I stood saying that you know, that's what I want to do, and you were in a pageant many years ago. Just, it's like in, like the same as you guys have like missed, whatever that's amazing. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

07:50

Did you wear one of your pageant dresses for your wedding? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

07:53

No, and we like. It's very different here. It is like so no, it's no, any of the same. We got you get given the dresses to wear and it's just like a little night. It's no way the American scale. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

08:04

So you weren't wearing lashes at like six years old. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

08:07

No, I was like I was like 19 probably, when we did that. You've got to be like go for 16. I think, okay, no, no, one of the end, no, but I stood on the stage and I said that that's what I would wanted to do, but at the time I just, you know, I was so far away from that. I worked, you know, dealing with waste services and I actually worked in the waste industry for a long time. And you know it's so strange because when you think about it, you know I was also in the industry. Yeah, I worked in, you know, buying things. So while I was doing all of this, I was saving up and buying bags and selling things on eBay and, you know, had this love of handbags going on in the background. And I actually, when I was 18, before I met my husband, nearly three years later, my God, you were so young, yeah, when I well, you know, when you wear your jeans and you handbag rubs on your jeans and it creates dye transfer, right, I had a screen bag and that happened to it and I was devastated and my boss at the time said hey, I've seen this van driving around. It says leather repair on it. Why don't you give them a call and she gave me a post-it note with the number on and I found out years later then it was my husband to be his business, because they fixed sofas and they write right right To leather products. So when we met three years later, I had no idea and it's just really strange because we met in 2010. And you know the increase in people asking for these. You know people saying, oh, my handbag has the same problem. So I kind of encouraged for this department to be set up that was dedicated to handbags. 

09:50

While I did, obviously, my day job, I was very loosely sort of involved in any of the day to day, but, as I say, I would be like a customer saying well, you know, for example, by that point I'd managed to buy a pair of Nebutans and I said the red souls come off straight away as soon as you wear them. Like, what can we do about that? Right, and you know we worked on the product to get those moving and then, by 2015, it was, like you know, we could actually make this a shop. However, if you're going to have a shop, you need to sell something in that shop, right? And it just made so much sense to sell pre-owned handbags and there weren't very many people in the UK at all doing it at that point. It was more you sort of thrift shops, you vintage stores you try to. So it was a very organic sort of growth to taking that plunge and at the time it was like what do I want to do by Chanel handbags or by me replacements? And I mean, it was obvious. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

10:48

I mean, that's really hard to decide. If you ask me, I don't know one is really sexy over the other. Did you ever have any experience buying a handbag that you realized after the fact was a fake? And I'm sure that had happened to you? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

11:04

Yeah, that happened to me for sure on, you know, the likes of eBay. So I've always been conscious of the authenticity of items because of shopping pre-owned for so long. But I was so fortunate that when we started the handbag clinic because the repair element had built up over around two years by this point I've had so much exposure to handbags and all sorts of kinds and types and ages that normally would not get hold of because it would be people sending bags into repairs. So I was able to start really cataloging what meant it was real, what didn't. You know, I didn't have to. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

11:41

Were you keeping detailed notes of this? Like this is for a Chanel bag for this particular style. You know, this is what the numbers start with. In the interior, the numbers and the code. I can tell you what. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

11:53

I can tell you the age of a handbag by what's in it. Like a Chanel, if you took, show me a zip, I'll give you a rough age. Like down to that level of detail you've got to. So you know that is was all catalogued and put together and you know I would spend hours and hours and hours of going through these handbags for repair until we sort of start building traction on the resale side. And now I mean we authenticate, god, tens of thousands of bags. It's, yeah, a lot of bags that we authenticate all the time because we offer an authentication service as well as our is selling through us as well. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

12:27

Just to add a curiosity if your husband was driving a truck that said leather repair, was that a family business that he took over, that he decided that, hey, let's have a truck drive around for services, for promotion. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

12:40

So they his father sold on a market stall a leather cleaner and a leather protector. So especially in the area where from in Newcastle in the northeast of England, there's a very famous market and he would sell this leather cleaner and protector on there. And my husband saw him doing that and thought you know what, you could sell these online and created a website to sell those online and now furniture clinic make every product for furniture you could imagine from it's in the US. It's like a huge big business now selling wood product, leather product, everything. But we still work super closely with them to develop our product. So we're always we have a special research and development team who will work with the chemists over at furniture clinic to make sure, for example, landscape leather on Chanel's is one. 

13:31

When you restore leather there can be texture implications Right, and we work with them to create a product that it reduces that as much as possible so that if you are getting Chanel lambskin repaired it stays as soft as it physically can. We also work with them on like specialist dies and specialist things, everything that we need in our clinic. Basically, so, yeah, both businesses have kind of taken off in different directions and he does the furniture product side and still helps us while his chemists help us. But I am fully handbag to Nick because I am a customer, as I say. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

14:09

This is so fascinating, so honestly, without him having the foresight, with his own father saying like, hey, you're doing this such on a small scale, we can do so much more. And then you get involved in saying, hey, you're doing this on such a small scale, we could do so much more. This is so incredible. Having purchased skins myself to make handbags, this is such an interesting narrative. Do you think like designers should be investing in this material to pre code or protect the letters before they even sell them? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

14:43

Yeah, like protection is how you make a handbag last Protection and ongoing maintenance, if you like I. 

14:51

Often we do like demos with staff, so what I tend to do is I'll get a small strip of leather I will protect one half of it and not protect the other and then you can, we'll tell it to scribble all over it with a biro pen and then the side that's been protected will clean enough and the other side obviously ruined not ruined because it can be repaired, right. 

15:12

Right, it's going to cost you a lot more money to have it repaired by one of our experts. You have to do a bespoke color match, have to use the right products and pigments and go through all of that process when, if it had just been protected, you could have cleaned it at home, and it really does make the difference. It is my number one thing I will preach forever about protecting and regular cleaning, especially of handles, or wipe them down all of the time. Re, protect them and your bags will last so much longer. I never need to book my bags at the clinic proudly, even though, yeah, because I just make sure that I look after them when I get them. So, yes, it is a really important part. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

15:52

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17:24

The fascinating thing is that people don't I mean for better or for worse when you're buying leather. It's a skin like any other skin, like the skin on our bodies. It wears, it ages, you know, like there's wear and tear, but the beautiful thing about the skin is that the oils from your hands it will actually, you know, make a product look that much more loved, which, in certain particular materials, like the original coach bags which, at least here in America, historically, if you went to any flea market or you know vintage store, the bags that you are most likely to see are these original coach bags before it was sold to Sarah Lee when they were using baseball glove mitts, which those can last a lifetime, because the leather was, like you know, everything was made in the USA. They had production in Florida, like they had the biggest factory in Florida. 

18:13

That's all gone now, of course, but in terms of the quality of the skins, everything has been diluted year after year after year because you know things get mass, people want price decreases. The quality always goes down. So there's this massive spread of what things cost, especially in leather, which I'm sure you can speak to. How come you never, with all this, never got to create your own brand to go? I mean, you have the capacity to say or were you like? Oh no, I don't even want to, I'm just not a designer. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

18:43

I'm just not a designer. I know what looks good, but I'm not the person to create that. It's just not in my skill set. I work well with you know, obviously, the authentication I've always naturally taken to analyzing the price points, making sure we're selling things at the right price point. But an actual crafting and designing and manufacturing process is so different and our processes are like no two days are the same, whereas obviously if you have something where you're putting out 50 to 50,000 units of something, you know it's a very linear process, whereas I kind of thrive in the chaos of what we do because it's right, you know something's in and it's white and it's going to go black. Something's in and it's getting fully restored, something's in it's getting a new lining and like there's always this, like something different happening every single day and that's just so much more me. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

19:38

Yeah, that is busy and I must say it's smart Because, as you know, with the cycle of bags coming in and out and trends like to get involved with that, it's like, wow, that's a whole other business right there. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

19:53

Yeah, it's a really difficult market and you know with the powerhouses if the brands and sell you know the big, big brands that do so well, it's so hard to break through. And you know we've seen brands like Zuckmas and other brands kind of start to really break into that and we see it transcend into the pre-owned market. You know we've seen when we first started doing this, tom Ford was a brand that we would sell quite frequently. We very rarely get a Tom Ford in anymore but we get lots of Zuckmas we get. We've obviously seen the rise of Lueve. I really enjoy that trend spotting piece from a kind of, you know, being part of a market. Yeah, that already exists around us. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

20:28

I want to talk a little bit about that in terms of trends and so forth, and in terms of bags then, if you dare even feel comfortable talking about it, because I don't want to make you talk about anything you don't feel good about. What bags have you seen, or certain silhouettes or so forth? Of which brands have you typically seen the ones that come in the most, that you're the least? Surprised that you're like yep, here it is again. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

20:54

I mean, the volumes that come through to us now are. You know I don't see everything that comes through every day. We have a team of buyers that I've personally trained and, however, when I do kind of browse the website, you know we are seeing a rise. I mean, we have the classics. It's always going to be the classics, it's going to be your classic Chanel's, it's going to be your classic Louis Vuitton models. You know you never fall, you speedies, but these are bags that are made to be timeless and I think it's great that we see them pass through the pre-owned market. 

21:22

The bags that I look at and I go how long are you going to last? Are things like the Bottega Jody bag. You know that tiny, small, with the knot. I feel like we at one point we would put those on the website and they would fly out in minutes, and now you see them hanging around a little bit longer because they're just not the most practical bag and they are a high price point. We've definitely seen a shift in, obviously, the Hermès market In 2016, we would have a Kelly for weeks before it would sell and you'd get a Birken 35 and it would leave the next day. Now those rolls have totally reversed with the trend of going from larger bags to smaller bags. You know, you see that trickle through into our market and sometimes it really hits with the bang that the Kelly switch from a larger size to a smaller size just was overnight. It's not wild. Yeah, it was really fast. It was really really fast with that brand. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

22:18

Within new designers creeping in? Are you seeing any new talent of brands beyond Jack-O-Mess and so forth of, like independent designers or designers that you're like, hey, here's some that you should look out for because they've come to your clinic that people are starting to want to get their hands on? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

22:37

No, not hugely, not more independent things. We do see smaller brands come through and we do see trends move through those smaller brands through our clinic, even if we don't kind of buy and sell them. But there's none that are really jumping out to me. We did have the JW Anderson trend a few years ago and that definitely has sort of dropped off. Now it's more this resurgent of yellow webbays and I think Mu Mu we now Mu Mu is quite an even-out-one brand of the air. Last year not really made it into the bags yet they're one if bag away from being huge again and it'll be really interesting to see when that changes. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

23:15

That's so interesting in terms of Mu Mu and obviously Mu Mu is tied to Proud of it. Yeah, exactly so. A lot of people don't even know that. So when they speak about that, in recognizing one versus the other and realizing that the trends of one, how the brand is so totally designed, is like almost night and day that you wouldn't even know that they were related. Yeah, it is. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

23:40

People never, ever have that thing so. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

23:45

I just want to talk a little bit about the evolution of trends post-COVID that you've seen in terms of bags that you've seen coming in. I know novelty within the past couple years has really seen an uptick. As you said, smaller bags, obviously the jocamus bag. That holds nothing but it's still the bag that if you want to be seen carrying it's definitely a talking piece. Can you talk a little bit about trends of bags that you've seen in terms of sizes or silhouettes that you think are on their way out or on their way in? Just based on what you see from the website coming through the clinic? Yeah, definitely. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

24:21

So obviously we had a huge boom of 19 themes coming through with the Prada Nylons, the small Pesheths, the Gucci Boat Pesheths and Dior Pesheths and obviously the Louis Pesheths as well, and I think people have kind of realized that they're not the most practical bag. So what I think we'll have is an elevation of that Pesheth, so shoulder bag that fits a little bit more in, that is almost crescent moon and shade is going to really rise. And then we're also definitely seeing a trend move towards which is a little bit Obviously. We've had quite luxury which was, yeah, let's not scream about brands, let's not be covered in logos, but I think people miss that element of glamour and I think that that's going to come back in with kind of studs and chains and this really impactful kind of detailing on bags Like the Alexander Wang bag from 2014, 15, the one that had the studs all at the bottom. 

25:22

Yeah, the Rocco and the Deagle, yeah, yeah, yeah, those types of bags we may see come through. I think you know we're seeing it already with the Lowewe chain bag that they have Looks though anything with that. I think you'll see a rise, which will do really well for some of the old modern Gucci pieces, because they tended to go for those really big, chunky metalworks and the Sachi and brands like that that tended to go for that chunkier look. I think that we'll definitely see a rise in those and anything as a crescent moon shape, a Jackie's probably a little too square, but a kind of condensed version of that. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

26:02

It's so funny because I contributed to you an article, couple articles recently for Women's Wear, for two different actually one of the writers is out of the UK and I was saying the exact same thing to the T. So it makes me feel good that at least I'm on trend as per what you're saying, because obviously you deal with this more on a day to day than I do because I'm. I'm in it but peripheral, I'm not going in seafield touching. Is it interesting for your craftsmen to deal with materials that aren't leather, like the nylon bags, the coated nylon? I mean, was that something that obviously crafts person is a crafts person, but was that something that needed to be added on? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

26:42

No, we've always seen a huge range of you know everything come from our clinic. We've worked on everything from unbranded bags to the most expensive emers, birkin crocodile skins to I don't know backgammon sets and boxing gloves and like it's so fast what we've done, right, but we are restricted on your suede and your fabrics. With leather, we can create magic. We can change its color. We can remove a stain. We can definitely. In COVID it's really bad actually. We saw a lot of dogs chewing bags and even in the people got a lot of dogs. Yeah, people got a lot of dogs. But also we saw where arguments escalated and handbags became the victim and there was knives put through handbags and all sorts of crazy things. 

27:29

That's amazing, but with those we can fix it. But if it is fabric and if it is suede, you are going to struggle and they are the bags that you have to protect and you have to clean regularly and be careful why you use them, because if they go they're way harder to save than sometimes impossible to save. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

27:50

Suede is the devil's work of material. I always say like run, run, run. I mean the first collection I did had a small. I did a handful of them in suede and they were beige and left the record stand that never do a beige suede bag ever. Because by the time it gets to the store to resell your bag, one stain on it or from one person touching it you're going to get the charge back as the designer saying sorry, this is unsellable. So I say run for the hills with that one. Yeah, it is a shame because it's beautiful but it's so lovely, but like you're going to have to walk around with it like that, not to touch it. 

28:25

One final question, in terms of, you know, obviously, being an expert within this market, how do you deal with reselling bags at a retail price point when they go up and down in terms of demand? So how do you deal with that, saying okay, there's less of this, more people want it. I know I can jack up the price Now there's so many of them were lowing the price purely out of the supply and demand. How do you deal with that? 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

28:54

So, we created bespoke software back in 2019, which tracks the sort of how long a bag will sit on our website versus the general market, whether the RRP increases as well, because obviously, when an RRP you know Chanel increased their prices, that will, and what does that mean? Just in case, the retail price basically, so what Gucci, chanel, louis Vuitton will sell their bags, that they will increase that and sort of anywhere from one to three times a year, and our software actually looks at that. So it will flag to our buyers, who also are trend focused, trend spotting, always looking ahead, and it will flag to them. You know we are seeing a real increase in demand and it's all based on supply and demand. Right, we go for a sort of trend, a data lead point, with that human overlay, looking from a trend point of view. 

29:48

So, saying you know, I mean there's one that will always bite me, which is the Dior saddlebag, because we didn't have the software or anything then and there was just kind of me buying handbags and we couldn't sell a Dior saddlebag for any theorist, I bet, yeah, it took so long and we used to buy them for 150 pounds, max, max, max, 150 pounds. And then, once they were in that runway show. They went up overnight and to over 1000 pounds, and I just wish I'd scoop them all up at that point in time, but it's always one that will bite me. But yeah, we do it very data led, we have very smart systems and we're actually working with a local university to create AI software that will allow us to improve that as well, because what we really want to do is we want to create a fair price for the pre-owned market. 

30:39

So it isn't just what somebody on you know is selling their bag for on a marketplace or isn't what one brand picks. This is looking at the overall market and sell through rates and clear demand from these people and making sure that we get a fair price for our pre-owned items, because, you see, I mean some of them just it's outrageous. It's outrageous. Yeah, I've seen Chanel bags for 21,000 pounds on some of these sites and I'm like come on, like yeah, it's just not possible. So that's really at my mission, because I'm somebody who loves bags and I would never have had access to this level of bags without the pre-owned market. Yep, so I want to make sure that it's fair and transparent for everybody. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

31:21

Yeah, no, I think that's amazing, especially since COVID there was a obviously a dip in demand, right? Nobody wanted to buy bags as much. And then the uptick of the pre-owned market just started to come up right where people are like why should I buy a new one? I could buy an old one. So I'm sure if you were like this is an odd spike, considering no one's going out. 

31:46

And then to have this issue with cargo and ships and so forth, with the clog of the boats, of them getting to the ports, which led to the backlog in supply, and then people were getting bags in and products that were like two seasons old because it was delayed, and then to have the material prices go up. So a Chanel bag that was 3,000 is now like 15,000 or something. It's a lot of work on your end to keep up with in terms of like, okay, well, what are we charging it today, considering they're now charging the retail three times higher? So that obviously I mean you are so ahead of the curve to have the capacity to be, like you know, the one to watch in terms of what pricing for these items really should be. That's amazing. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

32:34

Yeah, we is say, when we created the software it was very basic, but it's definitely relaunched it again this year with the new version and we are looking for all you know improvements and we also want it super easy. We don't want customers to have to upload a lot of photos and tell us a lot of information. You know it all works super quick, super fast and that's you know what we want the difference to be really into. Set a precedent for the pre-owned market that if you're going to use a reseller, it should be so easy, so quick and a fair price. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

33:05

Was this your idea? Were you like sitting with your husband? You're like we need a software. I can't do this anymore, or this is ridiculous. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

33:13

Yeah, because I was just surrounded by paper and the demand was creeping up and at this point there was me and I'd employed one other buyer to work me and I'd start training them and the demand was just getting out of control? 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

33:25

Were you just like going through stacks, like, well, what was that sold and do you have it on that spreadsheet and what did we charge it for the last time? And just like I can't do this anymore. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

33:34

Yeah, exactly, yeah, that was exactly it. Look at you. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

33:38

Charlotte, this has been enlightening. I'm so happy we connected. Thank you for entertaining my LinkedIn messages saying we need to chat. This is going to be amazing. Our audience is going to go bananas over this. How can and I'm assuming you deal with the international market because you will so much more after this how can one learn about the handbag clinic? Sell their pre-owned bag, buy a pre-owned bag, get their bag fixed? How does all that work? Tell us, please. 

Charlotte Staerck

Guest

34:08

So we are at handbagclinic.cou.k. We also are on all social media YouTube, instagram, tiktok which is the handbag clinic. Look for the pink round logo and that is us. 

Emily Blumenthal

Host

34:22

Fabulous Charlotte. I can't wait, definitely going to be in touch. I'm going to make sure everybody sends their bags to you, because obviously that's where they should go with your fast authentication and fair pricing. Thank you so very much for being part of the handbag designer 101 podcast. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to rate and review and follow us on every single platform at handbag designer. Thanks so much. See you next time. 

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