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Camile Tagle from FABSCRAP on Handbag Designer 101 Podcast every Tuesday

Updated: Dec 21, 2023





Emily Blumenthal

Host

00:00

Hi and welcome to the Handbag Designer 101 podcast with your host, Emily Blumenthal, handbag designer expert and handbag fairy godmother, where we cover everything about handbags, from making, marketing, designing and talking to handbag designers and industry experts about what it takes to make a successful handbag. Hi, Camille, welcome to the Handbag Designer 101 podcast.

Camille Tagle

Guest

00:29

Hey, thanks so much for having me Really excited to be here.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

00:33

I am more than you, I think. So today we have Camille Tagle, co-founder and creative director of Fab Scrap. So would you like to tell us a little bit about what Fab Scrap is and the origin story, and we can dive right in? Yes, yes absolutely so.

Camille Tagle

Guest

00:50

For those of you who haven't heard of Fab Scrap, we're a non-profit. We're based in New York and Philadelphia. Our whole mission is just to keep fabric and materials out of landfill, and specifically the fabric and materials that are coming from companies. I think when we talk about textile waste we automatically assume, oh, it's all the clothing and made items that I toss from my closet, right? But there's so much more that happens at a commercial level and there's a lot of waste that ends up happening throughout the design process and the sampling process. So what Fab Scrap does is to partner with as many brands as possible who are wanting to dispose of that waste responsibly, and we pick up that textile waste from them and we bring it back to our warehouse. We sort through it and it either gets downcycled into different types of industrial insulation or which we always prefer if it's in good enough condition to be reused and to have an extended life. We have a thrift store type of setup where people can shop. Anyone from the public can come to shop and access those designer materials at a discounted price. So that's Fab Scrap, kind of in a nutshell.

01:56

The whole segue of me kind of transitioning to Fab Scrap and co-founding the nonprofit is. I actually was a designer, I designed evening wear, so, wow, cocktail dresses, cows. I was, yeah, very different. Life like before.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

02:10

I was playing with like sequins and silk, and now I'm at loading docks or Pellegrins, like very different but I can only imagine the ensemble differences of a day job of that versus like at a loading dock. So, so different. Are you camera ready at the loading dock, like I'm here?

Camille Tagle

Guest

02:29

It is a wildly different experience but it's been very exciting in that way. But you know, even whereas admittedly a very frivolous category of fashion, it's definitely more one time use. You know most people dare wear a gown. You know twice to different event, and so I think it was during that time as a designer where I started to witness, you know, all the waste that was happening. That was definitely something they didn't talk about back when I was at school, very unprepared for seeing all that type of waste accumulate after each collection. They didn't impact.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

03:00

You Like, were you like, oh my God, yeah, like, did it hurt your heart? Seeing all that I mean? Yeah.

Camille Tagle

Guest

03:05

That's how I felt the motivated to co-found Fab Scrap, and I think what really got to me was how much of the fabric was reusable, like there's so much yardage and people I think think automatically, oh, they must be really tiny scraps and like difficult pieces to use, but the amount of yardage and like usable pieces that were being thrown to landfill. And then remembering how I was as a student and wanting to benefit from working with as many materials as possible, I think I just kind of called back on my own memories of a student in aspiring designer and kind of thought, well, if I can get these into the hands of creatives, you could really use them. Then everyone wins, you know. So that was kind of, I think, the fire behind kind of walking away from what was essentially a dream job and deciding to come up with solutions. No-transcript. I met my partner, Jessica Schreiber, and her background was in waste with working with New York Sanitation.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

03:59

I had to find her. How do you meet someone who works in sanitation? Like, was that at a cocktail party of recycled cups? Like what was that?

Camille Tagle

Guest

04:07

Oh, it was so random. We just had a mutual friend in common who happened to be up on what I was doing and to be aware of what she was doing. And I was talking to this mutual friend of her coffee and she was like you know, you guys have the same passion, you're just. You just have wildly different backgrounds and you're approaching it in different ways that we should talk. And yeah, it was very, very so.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

04:29

did you guys meet for coffee after? Like, how was the hookup? Like hey?

Camille Tagle

Guest

04:34

how'd that work? I just cold emailed her. You know, getting the contact from her mutual friend, said hey, we have this friend in common. We'd love to hear what you're working on. At that point I was doing pop-up sales at different schools and bringing some of the fabric waste to there, directly to students.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

04:50

While you still had a day job. So little crazy.

Camille Tagle

Guest

04:54

It was a lot of life-carrying fabric on subways and in calves and, like you know, it was a lot. But yeah, yeah, so I, you know, I was able to talk to Jessica, hear her start a fab scrap with, like the service part, because obviously, from unit sanitation, the method and logistics, like where you have everything, yeah Just was something that she was thinking okay, this could apply exactly to fabric. And so when we met, for her it was also a serendipitous moment because she was starting to realize how much of it was reusable and, not having a background in design, and she was like I don't know what this fabric is, what you use it for, and so I think it was really just I hate to be cliche, but it was a little like fate, like pushing it together and really, with our combined experiences being so different we were garbage and couture we were able to achieve maximum diversion from landfill.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

05:43

Yeah, Well, so many questions. I like hope you have enough time, so wait a second. So having a partner, let alone having a partner with anything, is difficult, right. Like even the person you commit to marrying is difficult, right. Like like that in itself, like the Q and A alone thing I want to spend the rest of my life with you is enough to like. After the fact, you're like wow, I didn't know this until we were together. That in itself, like okay, you had a meeting of the minds, you had a vision aligned. Were there hiccups, like just getting together was like oh my God, I want this too. And oh my God, like that in itself is interesting to me, because having absolutely nothing in common except for the same vision, how did that work? And also, you're a non-for-profit. Was that the goal?

Camille Tagle

Guest

06:30

Yes, yes, so we both came into that already having non-profit in mind, which was again great. But it's so funny that you mentioned that, because so many partnerships are very difficult and I like that you don't have this similar way of looking at it as like a marriage, because that's definitely the type of partnership it is, and so it's really funny. But it's almost as if we met on a blind date.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

06:53

It was a blind date 100%.

Camille Tagle

Guest

06:55

It was like, if you want to look at it this way, we met on a blind date. We knew each other for maybe like a month or so, and then you're like we're just jacking up Exactly oh my God, when I tell the story to other people and I actually have to hear myself say how the partnership happened.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

07:13

Yeah, we met once and then it was like, yeah, let's do this. And then we were like, let's get in office. And then let's like I'll go through the garden with you and I'll pull the fabric leftover of my day job, Like, yeah, these files.

Camille Tagle

Guest

07:23

Crazy Right. Like it sounds like when you hear people who went on a blind date, didn't know each other and get married.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

07:30

Like that is the reaction and you're like what did you do Like?

Camille Tagle

Guest

07:33

you don't even know this person and we never worked together, we didn't know each other's work style like gather, with a lot of things that we didn't cover before we just went for it. But I think, honestly, it was just this really unspoken understanding and connection and the fact that we had each already started that work on our own. We were able to really bond over, like when I say, lugging fabric and the subways and up by four walk ups. Yeah, we had this shared experience already and I think we knew that somebody would only do that and subject themselves to it. Yeah, we really were so passionate, yeah, we were serious about it, and so I think when we were trading stories, that was kind of thing that really like cemented our bond, I think, is just knowing that we would do whatever it took and, along with a partnership, any compromises that would be needed to end up making the outcome as best as possible.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

08:29

Well, let me ask you something Just dating back to who you are. So it's so fascinating, right, like, growing up, my grandmother, who was an immigrant nothing was wasted to the point where it was embarrassing. Right, as a kid, like I remember going to a restaurant with my sister and my grandmother and you know she was taking the sugar, she was taking whatever they brought out. It went in her bag and you were like, oh my God, I hope no one sees. And it's so interesting.

08:57

Now, in hindsight, even with food, like here are the bones. We're going to do something with it, like there was always something to be used, because the construct of wasting as an immigrant is offensive. Right, and I'm absolutely God forbid someone sees the amount of paper towels I use. I could get convicted and truly like I strive to be better along those lines. But did anything like you growing up have this? You know, because to go into fashion and design without being aware of the wastage, obviously that was something that was passionate, that put you on that path. Did anything, though, growing up make you more into the sustainability angle without even being aware?

Camille Tagle

Guest

09:35

It's interesting that you asked that because I definitely had many moments as a kid where I would just kind of look around at all the variety of everything like whether it was a grocery store or like a toy store or whatever and just actually have these moments of why do we need all of this, Like just really understanding, even at a young age, like there is too much offered out there. Like there's too much.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

09:59

Are you a first time girl? Are you the?

Camille Tagle

Guest

10:01

artist. No, I'm actually second Second, yeah, I have a brother, yeah, got it. But it was weird, and even at the time I realized like, oh, that's a weird thing for a kid to think, you know, and then 100%, and then you know I go into fashion and you know, I think from that it was really having a more comprehensive look at everything, and that's, I think, what made me even stop to ask questions. And I think that's kind of the issue right now is that people aren't asking questions. And that's what I started asking myself was how did this become waste and what did we do for it to become waste and how can we in the future start to prevent this from happening?

10:43

And so those are very simple questions, but I think when you're in that designer mindset and there's collection after collection, you don't actually take that time to stop and really, well, you don't have that time. Yeah, yeah, you really don't, and you're just onto the next thing. There's no real reflection. But I think it was just seeing those bags collect in the corner of the studio and somehow they disappeared and then they would come back, and it was just. I think, realizing how much I was contributing to the issue really made me stop at her. Yeah, and I think what do I actually want my legacy to be and what do I actually want my contribution to decided to be? Do I want to continue to design and add to these issues or having some ideas? Do I want to actually create some change?

Emily Blumenthal

Host

11:30

So when you were working at these coveted jobs because I know you worked at some places that people you know, devil wears Prada angle we killed to have that role, like killed to be designing you know, evening wear. We killed to have their visions translated into seeing people actually wearing them on such a high level and it's such an expensive price point. Those bags of which you're speaking, you know, all of a sudden the bags disappeared and you were the ones taking them.

Camille Tagle

Guest

11:57

You're like no, no, no, no, no, no, like you know, like smuggling them out it started small and first it was just, yes, doing cold calls to schools, but a lot of schools were set up to actually receive the waste and actually redistribute it.

12:11

So then it became this like coordinated effort with interns and it was just sending them down to the Senate Avenue in cabs full of fabric to their individual classes where they would just redistribute it to their classmates Yep, so it started with that and I think that's kind of where more ideas for kind of packaging, reuse in a way where these materials could be shoppable, ended up being popups at school, which ended up being like a retail location combined with Jessica, like being able to have a lot of offering through fab scraps and have fab scraps be like that resource for anyone from the public can go, and now we even have an online store, and so I think it was really just understanding there are people who will work with it and who will continue the life of this product and this amazing fabric, and they're going to do it at restore pricing, like it really is a no-brainer, and I think, with sampling, you know all the role that we would be receiving for the perfect yardages and amounts for an entrepreneur who is just starting up, who wants like a smaller line.

13:13

So it really became very helpful. I think it's just that no one wanted to take the time to organize the process and to think through okay, like how can I kind of make this less overwhelming to look through? How can I make it easier to shop?

Emily Blumenthal

Host

13:27

So couple things. One, any of the companies you worked at, did they continue to implement said program that you unofficially started While I was a designer? It?

Camille Tagle

Guest

13:36

was really just me maybe one other co-worker in one moment when they were employed there, but it was really just me trying to do it in between collections and model fittings and you know, and working with powder makers, and so I think I'm happy now that we have Fab Scrap in the world and so essentially there's a way for everyone to kind of do what I was doing and it's definitely in a more streamlined, more like efficient way. But I think I was really the only person at the time I was designing who even thought, oh, maybe we should do something with this, yeah, be able to redistribute this, because really it would just get thrown out.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

14:15

So, with those materials, though, do you know if the designers who are using your materials is there a Fab Scrap stamp that they can have an ad to their website that they're part of the circular economy? Because I think and again I pardon my ignorance to this, but I think, you know, using it as part of their narrative is really powerful.

Camille Tagle

Guest

14:41

Oh, absolutely, and we do get questions like is it okay if we have your logo on our site, if we have a blurb?

14:48

I always say yes, I'm always happy to also just even help provide them, like other plate language so that you think, for people to be able to talk to their customers about it. But I think the important part too is that when we receive fabric into our warehouse it doesn't have the label, and so the most we could do is burn tests the fabric to know the exact type of content. And I know if somebody's designing a product and they're selling it, they have to disclose what the content is, and so I think that's also helpful in explaining both, like the, I guess, the logistics of selling the item of. Like you know, this piece is probably stylistic, natural, but it was sourced from Fab Scrap, and Fab Scrap is this organization that does this, and I choose to source with them because I'm sustainably focused. I think it helps also explain some of the things that people are looking for in a more traditional sense. But yeah, 100%. Anytime someone wants to add in more information, to kind of explain where the product was sourced, always happy to do that.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

15:47

Do you think in terms of the materials that you have available? Because, prior to recording you and I spoke about this limited edition, bespoke one of a kind. Typically with that, unless you are a seasoned designer, it would truly reflect on the fact that a designer doesn't have the experience, doesn't have enough materials and therefore their margins are off because they just don't know any better right, or they're producing domestically and they need to make money that they end up selling their products in our case, bags significantly higher. But realistically, no customer is going to spend that much money on a bag that's so much higher, unless it's a label, established brand. How do you work with designers in order to help extend their potential success with that in mind, with these materials? Because it's one thing to have them use it for samples, it's another for them to use it for production. So how do you guys work with designers in terms of that kind of situation?

Camille Tagle

Guest

16:45

Yeah, that's a really, really great question, and I think it always comes back to that really comprehensive outlook that I mentioned before, which is, for me, I think, the biggest thing to focus on. I think, when you approach circularity is that, from the very, very first point of any design, thinking through the entire process Right, and I think to what you were saying. When designers don't really know what exactly they're doing, it's because they're only going at each step as it comes down to them, I think, yeah, so, because it's really rushed, chaotic, like, oh, I got to quickly pivot and do this. Oh, now what, oh, now what, yeah, and that's where the crazy pricing come in, that's where there's just not enough thought. I think at the beginning and that is definitely reflected in a cornerstone of circularity is to really think through that entire process, and so that definitely stems back to even the material that you choose to use for that design idea that you might have. And so, with FabScrap and the education that we do, it's just explaining the textile waste and how that happens, but using that as almost a learning lesson of this is currently what happens, but this is not what has to happen.

17:57

And really, I think, with any designer entering the industry, regardless of what category of fashion they're entering in. There is a responsibility now because there's so much more information than there was 10, 20 years ago and five years ago Even five years ago. There's so much more awareness, so much information, and so it's not factor circularity into your design process or any sort of sustainable step in some way. Really, I just think that the definition of a designer is changing as we're learning more about sustainability and I think there's a responsibility there. And so one is definitely knowing your materials being able to source from somewhere responsible. FabScrap had a lot of deadstocks. That would be one example. But even also thinking through, once your customer is done using it, what is the recyclability of that material that you were thinking of using? If it can't be recycled, then what would be the alternative, realistically, of what that customer would do once they're done? Would you have the take back program? Would there be a second or third design that you would come up with, knowing that that item could be taken back?

Emily Blumenthal

Host

19:07

Yeah, there would be a lot of Coaches done with I think it's Coach Topia.

Camille Tagle

Guest

19:11

Oh yeah, they have a great launch. That's what they're doing. They're using their own deadstock, which is a great example. I know Lowen Suns also did their own patchwork bags with their own deadstock. God's Bag is into brands that I just came across and they are in the middle of highlighting what it looks like to have a take back program. So I think, yeah, when you're entering the industry, at a minimum it's considering the materials you're working with when did you buy them? What happens to it at the very, very end of the cycle. And then, once you're able to ask some of those other questions up front, then you're able to plan a little better and then, knowing that, okay, the goal amount of whatever price you want that bag to sell at, working backwards from that and saying, okay, well then I'll be able to buy from FabScrap and that'll make my cost less than if I go with this factor, I think there's just more planning that you could do. I think, when you're looking at it in a more comprehensive way, Are your prices, especially as a nonprofit?

Emily Blumenthal

Host

20:09

do you find your prices are competitive Because it's so unfortunately difficult to produce domestically that could designers purchase let's just say, even linings or something from FabScrap and then ship it overseas? So at least there is that one element of sustainability that they know is part of the bag, because it's so difficult to make every little piece of it. It's almost like you can only do so much, right, right, we have so many different types of materials.

Camille Tagle

Guest

20:40

So, yes, fabric and lining for sure, but even leather hides like we have leather hides, we have special. Do people ship it overseas? I'm sure some of them do. Yeah, I think. Again it kind of comes back to knowing the material. So maybe that leather hide, if you have like three or four different ones, maybe they're not made that by lots, but you know them well enough to know the thickness is at least consistent, all right, the grains are at least somewhat consistent, or the square footed that leaves consistent, and then you're able to use that as quantity and in volume for production.

21:13

But just so many different materials. We even have the hardware. We have so many different types of trim, webbing, like anything to use for straps, like there really is not an end to waste. And how many things come to fab scraps, zippers, zippers, everything, yeah, zippers, buckles, webbing, of course, lining fabric, but also felt fabric. There's just so much. And I would actually honestly really surprised how much hides we get into, like leather and fur. And so it's just there is no shortage of ways to go around, and that's why I think we have to really consider more deeply our cause and effect and hopefully, when we do that, then we're able to make better choices about the types of places that we support and where our dollar goes to as well.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

22:00

Do you think, as a designer who's established just in your opinion, who is producing overseas, do you think it's enough for them to try and at least have one or two pieces within their assortment that could be, quote, unquote, fab, scrapped, based at least to try and I don't want to say check the box, because that totally minimizes what all this means but at least to try and do their best? Do you, in your opinion, think that still counts as an effort? 100%? And this is where you know, because there's that guilt you know of like, oh, the whole thing is in, so of course.

Camille Tagle

Guest

22:38

And that ends up being very crippling, because people think, oh well, if I can't do the whole thing, start to finish perfect, then I won't be able to do it, so I might as well not try, right. But if that were possible, then we wouldn't be in the situation that we are now, like there is no company that is doing it perfectly Right, and the thing that needs to happen is that more people just need to do better through the five steps, you know like, instead of zero, the five steps. And so I think that's where a lot of people in the education is really important, right. But I think that's where a lot of people almost yeah, they underestimate what their impact can do and how much of a difference they can make. I mean, fast scrap has like 10 employees, 10 to 12 employees, and over the course of our existence we've saved 1.5 million tons of fabric for landfill. And that's 10 to 12 people, you know Right.

23:32

And so I think people always assume, oh, I'm just a small designer, right, or I'm just like in this very early state. But there is no better time, I think, to really be an example setter, to try different things and to try different solutions, and they will have a difference, even if you are a small designer and I think that's also just setting yourself up for a success as well is this sustainability is not a trend. It's what we need to have happen, and so if you're one of the people who are figuring that out and really setting your entire business up front like that at the very beginning, you're really going to stand out as someone who is very, very knowledgeable, has done their homework, has figured out processes that work for them. I think that's something that a lot of people will really love too.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

24:21

One more question Now. You said you have hives, you said you have fur. Now for designers who are trying to check I keep saying check the box but for designers who are trying to make sure that they speak to sustainability and circularity, how do you suggest they approach the marketing angle that they are using dead stock, recycled materials, of materials that are theoretically not sustainable or not greed or not ego?

Camille Tagle

Guest

24:55

Yeah, we get a lot of questions about that, for sure, and, I think, anything related to talking to external communities about what you're doing and what you're working on, just being honest, just being really, really honest because, again, going back to the whole stigma of needing to be perfect, things change all the time. In sustainability, one day bamboo's the godsend and the savior, the next day bamboo is, like you know, even touch and think of sourcing, so it's always going to change. You're always going to have people who question you, especially on online and on social media. So that's unavoidable and, as someone who's starting a business and putting yourself out there and that's just something to accept is, you'll always have feedback. But if you're really honest about it and you're able to say, okay, this is something I'm trying because I care about this type of outcome, and someone ends up saying, oh well, that's actually wrong.

25:52

Blah, blah, blah. Like welcoming that and engaging with that comment of, oh, like, tell me more. I'd love to hear that. Maybe that could help improve X, y and Z. So I think, just always being really honest, I think trying to buffer in also a lot of education on your end, like if you decided to source this material from FabScrap doing a post just on that, like yeah, why did you choose that silk or grain from FabScrap, like why did you go with that hide? And I think telling those stories and explaining through a very personal experience, like why that story matters and what that story achieves.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

26:28

See, I want to just highlight that before we wrap up, that everything is an opportunity for marketing story, narrative, brands with fans and, like I'd even go so far as to say, press release, because anything to get more SEO for you. But that latest collection or newest collection, or we have committed that X amount of pieces within our collection of these materials are circular, are recycled, are purchased from. So our consumer always knows that, no matter what that perhaps the materials may not be perceived as one thing, note that they are because they came from somewhere else. So therefore it is okay to buy them because it's reused, it had another life.

Camille Tagle

Guest

27:11

Exactly, exactly, and I think, when you describe the full context as well, of, okay, I sourced from FabScrap because I care about this, but did you know that before it ended up with me it had this whole other journey? It's been all over these countries, maybe, like through this brand, that's touched many people. I think, really building in the full context and again kind of bringing back that whole like comprehensive overview, really just sharing with the audience as openly as possible this is why I care, this is what I know and this is the best that I'm doing.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

27:45

You know the interesting thing about leather for better or worse it is a skin and I remember when Coach launched, I did a project for them my final project for my MBA about coach and their expansion to Asia and, like the evolution of the brand, and it was initially made from baseball leather, or the baseball mitts were made from their leather. But that skin evolves right, it evolves over time. It evolves with color, with touch, with coils, and if it's going to be used and consumed, it's a beautiful thing to see the evolution of it and what it does and how can be used and the weight and having something that's seasoned and still around. I think, if anything could potentially validate the purchase, like hey, it's had this life and look how good it still is, it's worthy of a purchase for you Exactly, and anything that's really looked at with care is designed with the intention of longevity, like that's always going to stand out.

Camille Tagle

Guest

28:40

And yes, everyone can do marketing and promotion and everything, but I think when you have a really thoughtful product, there's no way that's going to go unnoticed.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

28:51

I totally, totally agree. Oh, my God, this was so amazing. I'm so happy we had you on, camille. This has been not only educational but exciting and also something that I think there's so many good points and takeaways from a branding perspective, from an eco perspective, but also from a I know I could do this. Even if it's just a little, it's still good enough, because doing something is better than nothing, which is a horrible thing to say, but it's the truth. If you're a brand or a designer, you got to just do something and again make that a touch point of your brand, let people know, let your audience know, because there's always an opportunity to educate, to teach and to get people excited to purchase, because we are a consumption economy to the point where it's disgusting, but we're all going to keep buying things. It's just the truth. We all need to buy food to eat, we all need to buy product. We need to buy something to make us happy. So if we're going to do it, let's do it in a way that's at least thoughtful to some degree.

Camille Tagle

Guest

29:50

Exactly, exactly, and I think when there's a really thoughtful product, when there's a really honest story, I think that again, there's no way that that's going to go unnoticed, and especially with there being so much competition and so many different places that someone could give their dollar to. If you're coming at it with I want to do better for the world, I want to support nonprofits or my community, having that as the cornerstone and the passion behind what you do, pastors are going to respond to that. They're going to want to support you as well, because they're knowing that you're also having a different effect elsewhere. So that, I think, is huge for brands to really consider and to really start adopting into their whole business model, for sure.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

30:34

Yeah, great, Camille, thank you. How can we follow you, learn more and get more information about FAB Scrap? Tell us everything.

Camille Tagle

Guest

30:43

Yes, you guys can always reach us on Instagram. Fab underscore scrap. On Twitter, Facebook we're all on everything. Definitely visit our website, fabscrap.org. If there's anything you guys have questions about, we have a team who could answer. If you're curious about recycling with us, If you're curious about having an educational presentation at your school, if you want to shop with us, everything is available on our website. But also our team is available to ask if they answer any questions that you might have about anything that we talked about today.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

31:12

Camille, thank you so much for being part of the Handbag Designer 101 podcast. This was absolute treat pleasure and we're so grateful to have had you for this time. Thank you so much.

Camille Tagle

Guest

31:21

I loved being on here. Thanks for having me.

Emily Blumenthal

Host

31:25

Thanks for listening. Don't forget to rate and review, and follow us on every single platform at Handbag Designer. Thanks so much. See you next time.

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